Library & Book Store

This section would offer a wide selection of Islamic books, competitive prices, efficient and innovative payment systems, fast delivery at customers' doorsteps and a host of value added e-mail services.

 

  • The virtually unlimited online shelf space will enable us to offer more than a million titles, which can be accessed using a very efficient search and retrieval interface.
  • A unique subject browsing facility to empower a customer to view books by subject categories without any interference, so as to enable him to take a well-informed decision.

  • Customers can also look forward to fast delivery at their doorsteps as well as efficient payment systems.

  • The store would ensure complete ease and security of payments with the assurance of safety in delivery of goods.

  • We will committ ourselves to the highest degree of customer satisfaction and delivery of inspiring and personalised e-commerce experience.

  • We will also provide our visitors with e-mail service which enables the visitors to submit the list of the books they would want to buy from us in future.

  • All these features will be complemented with a compelling content that includes interviews, news, events, author profiles, book reviews and all interesting facts about authors and books.


     

 

Featured Views

Jared Diamond on Islam

Professor of Physiology at the UCLA School of Medicine; recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1998.

      "Medieval Islam was technologically advanced and open to innovation. It achieved far higher literacy rates than in contemporary Europe; it assimilated the legacy of classical Greek civilization to such a degree that many classical books are now known to us only through Arabic copies.  It invented windmills, trigonometry, lateen sails and made major advances in metallurgy, mechanical and chemical engineering and irrigation methods. In the middle-ages the flow of technology was overwhelmingly from Islam to Europe rather from Europe to Islam. Only after the 1500's did the net direction of flow begin to reverse."

[Guns, Germs, and Steel - The Fates of Human Societies, 1997, p. 253]